Saturday, March 9, 2013

Don't miss the ATA 54 proposal deadline


The American Translators Association is accepting presentation proposals for ATA's 54th Annual Conference in San Antonio, Texas (November 6-9, 2013).

Proposals must be received by March 11, 2013.

Submissions are invited from all areas of translation and interpreting, including finance, law, medicine, literature, media, science and technology, terminology, independent contracting, business management, and training/pedagogy. Sessions may be language specific or general. You do not need to be an ATA member to submit a proposal.

Not sure about making a presentation? It is a challenge but also an opportunity-there is no better way to gain recognition in the translation and interpreting communities.


Friday, March 8, 2013

Don't Miss This Deadline


The American Translators Association is accepting presentation proposals for
ATA's 54th Annual Conference in San Antonio, Texas (November 6-9, 2013).

Proposals must be received by March 11, 2013.

Submissions are invited from all areas of translation and interpreting,
including finance, law, medicine, literature, media, science and technology,
terminology, independent contracting, business management, and
training/pedagogy. Sessions may be language specific or general. You do not
need to be an ATA member to submit a proposal.

Not sure about making a presentation? It is a challenge but also an
opportunity-there is no better way to gain recognition in the translation
and interpreting communities.

You can find out more and submit your proposal at the ATA Annual Conference website.

Thursday, March 7, 2013

Introducing: New Blog Editor


My name is Amy Lesiewicz, and I’m the newest member of the S&TD’s Leadership Council. I’ll be joining Tess Whitty as blog editor.
I was pleased when our fearless leader Karen Tkaczyk asked me to join the leadership council, because I’ve found a home among my fellow scientific and technical translators. We’ve all heard things like “Google Translate may be good enough for technical documents, but it will never replace literary translators” or “Someone translating into their non-native language might be able to cope with a technical text, but for marketing materials you really need a native speaker”. I was even told at the 2012 ATA Annual Conference that “technical translation is easier than marketing translation”! Statements like these light a fire in my belly!
I find science fascinating, and I love learning about the science behind the texts I translate. I often spend as much time researching the subject matter as I do actually writing my translations. To some translators who work in other fields, translating fungicide test reports or chemical reactor design documentation may seem uninspiring, but it’s what I live for.
Let’s look at the word valence. In chemistry, valence electrons are those “in the outermost principal quantum level of an atom”; in other words, they are located in the outermost shell of an atom, and can interact with other atoms to form covalent bonds. The number of valence electrons determines an atom’s chemical properties and behavior. In the periodic table, elements in the same group (vertical column) have the same number of valence electrons. But the word valence has other meanings as well. In immunology, valence is the number of antigen-binding sites on an antibody molecule. In linguistics, valence is the number of satellite noun phrases with which a verb combines. The etymology of valence is Latin valentia (related to the word valiant), which means “strength, capacity,” from valere, “to be strong”. According to Stedman’s Medical Dictionary, valence also means “the attraction or aversion that an individual feels toward a specific object or event.” Another definition is “the ability to unite, react or interact successfully with another”.
That’s us, in a nutshell. We’re out on the fringes, on the edges, on the forefront, hanging out in the outermost orbitals, grabbing onto other concepts, other ideas, other disciplines, other languages. We’re reactive. We combine. We bond. We’re strong. We’re attracted to science and language. We unite, react, and interact successfully with others.
We’re technical translators. What do we make? We make connections.
Amy Lesiewicz translates from Russian to English. She started out as a chemistry student but began taking Russian classes as a junior in college and fell in love with the language. After earning her BS in chemistry, she went on to earn a BA and MA in Russian language and a Certificate of Advanced Study in translation. She spent a year in Moscow working as an in-house translator, followed by three and a half years at an engineering company in Houston translating for Russian oil and gas projects. She has been freelancing since 2011.

Tuesday, March 5, 2013

Note from the Administrator


As you know, teams called Leadership Councils run ATA divisions. It’s time for the Science and Technology division to renew ours for 2013. This council will run March-November 2013. By making the period less than one year we will be coordinated with annual conferences and administrator changeovers from then on.

Two people are leaving as we do this: Vincent Lai and Steven Marzuola. We thank them for what they have done for the division, especially Steve, who was so involved in getting it up and running again in 2010. We have one new council member, Amy Lesiewicz, whom a lot of us met in San Diego. Amy will be blog editor so you will hear more from her here soon.

Some other people have moved roles—the summary is below. If any of you reading would like to become involved, please drop me a note and we can chat about it. We would particularly like to hear from anyone who might want to help plan a division dinner in San Antonio.

Roles:

Karen Tkaczyk: DA, HQ communications, Twitter feed, conference prep, miscellaneous.

Matthew Schlecht: ADA, and working on the Yahoo group.

Nick Hartmann: general counsel

Tess Whitty: blog editor and LinkedIn admin

Lebzy Gonzalez: monthly website news update, website admin

Alicja Yarborough: help conference dinner planner

Susanna Weerth: blog articles

Stephanie Strobel: site tours

Amy Lesiewicz: blog editor, help with local knowledge for San Antonio.

Petra Schweitzer: Facebook and Yahoo group admin

Iryna Ashby: Webmaster and Facebook admin

If you ever have any ideas for improving divisions services, please let any member of the council know.

Regards,

Karen Tkaczyk
2011-2013 Science and Technology Division Administrator